The Disaster Artist Review (Spoilers!): An Unconventional Inspiration

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The Disaster Artist, directed by James Franco is a funny, dramatic, and oddly inspiring film about the legend behind the greatest worst movie of all time. It manages to strike a balance between an objective retelling of one individual’s crazy life while also managing to be relatable. Based on the making of the 2003 film, The Room, The Disaster Artist follows Greg Sestero, a young actor, as he meets the enigmatic Tommy Wiseau. Wiseau, played brilliantly by James Franco himself, is a cornucopia of mystery. Though he claims to be from New Orleans, he is very clearly of European descent; though he appears to be in his 20’s during the making of the film, he is clearly at least in his 40’s; and to top it all off, he has a “bottomless pit” of cash which was used to fund The Room ($6 million estimated) though no one knows how he got it.

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The film begins with Greg, played by Dave Franco, meeting Tommy at a comedy class where the two strike up an unlikely friendship. Greg asks to “do a scene” with Tommy, leading to a particularly memorable diner scene where Greg shares his fear of getting laughed at by audiences. Tommy bursts Greg’s bubble by having the two of them shout lines from a play in front of the customers in the diner. It’s a hilarious moment that also highlights the necessity to be bold and forthright. Tommy even tells Greg, “Don’t worry about these people! There only you and there only me! “.

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Eventually, Greg moves to Los Angeles with Tommy and they both start their acting careers, which unfortunately doesn’t go well for them. Tommy has a particularly hard time when he confronts a Hollywood producer played by Judd Apatow. The genius of Franco’s performance is that Tommy is portrayed as both sympathetic and unhinged. He acts brazenly and loud in front of the producer, however, you still feel for him when he is insulted and told he will never be successful. When Greg and Tommy decide to make their own movie, it comes off as a statement of resolve and perseverance. Despite what everyone tells Tommy, his determination to express his weird creative persona to the world overpowers the Hollywood system that is rejecting him, and he wouldn’t have been able to do it had he not had Greg along to motivate him. As an audience member, you truly understand the shift in Tommy’s life as he goes from isolated weirdo to aspiring artist with Greg at his side. It should strike a chord with any ambitious artists when Tommy is writing the script for The Room. Despite the fact that you know the end result will be terrible, you can see the determination and hope as he partakes in the creative process.

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Once the filming of The Room begins, the film adjusts to a more objective, behind the scenes, point-of-view second act. It’s clear that Tommy truly doesn’t know what he is doing as he makes ridiculous and costly decisions like shooting the movie in both digital and film, installing his own director’s bathroom on the set, and even recreating a fake alleyway set right next to an actual alleyway in order to have “real Hollywood movie”. Not only is he shown as irresponsible, he is also neurotic and downright vicious at times. He films the cast members secretly and tells the actress playing the female lead role of Lisa that her body is “disgusting”. There are fights with the cast, people passing out from heat exhaustion because Tommy doesn’t pay for A/C, and Greg being forced to pass on career building roles. Eventually, Tommy fires everyone and hires a low budget crew which leads to a falling out between Tommy and Greg. This entire second act reveals a different side of Tommy as the sociopathic, ill-mannered director. You still understand that he is ignorant of the true nature of his actions. You know that he has good intentions yet you are horrified at his behavior. Though this should conflict with the film’s overall message of following your dreams no matter what, it somehow works as a necessary observation on the struggles of trying to execute your vision to perfection, which is yet another part of the creative process.

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The film’s final act culminates in the premiere of The Room at Los Angeles’s Laemmle Theatre. Greg reluctantly agrees to go with Tommy and they arrive in a white limo, greeted by the film’s cast and crew. The reenacted scenes of The Room are uncanny, even though they have been recreated by the new actors, a few scenes feel as if they’ve come straight from the DVD of the original. It’s also heartbreaking to see Tommy realize that everyone is laughing at the film rather than praising it as the dramatic masterpiece that he sees. We get another poignant moment when he leaves the theatre and is convinced by Greg that despite the fact that people didn’t see what he saw in the film, there is no doubt that they have found enjoyment in it and that Tommy has accomplished his goal of making his own movie. The epilogue of the movie describes the continued partnership of Tommy Wiseau and Greg Sestero and the perpetual success of The Room since its inception.

 

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HOLLYWOOD, CA – NOVEMBER 12: Tommy Wiseau attends the screening of “The Disaster Artist” at AFI FEST 2017 Presented By Audi at TCL Chinese Theatre on November 12, 2017 in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Neilson Barnard/Getty Images)

One of the main reasons The Disaster Artist works so well as a biographical comedy is the simplicity of its message. Everyone has probably heard the motivational phrases: always following your dreams, don’t worry about what anyone else thinks. The way The Disaster Artist stands out from the rest of the pack is by showing you a real-life example of how these lessons allowed a socially maladjusted person like Tommy Wiseau to become a world-renowned icon. It’s an unconventional story, but you can see how Wiseau was fearless in his pursuit of his goal. The absurdity of Tommy and Greg’s success ignites a spark of hope in all who view this film as a reminder that no matter how bad or how good your own creative ideas are, if you are willing to go the distance and put yourself out there, there is always a chance that your vision will catch on and offer something unique to the world even if the world doesn’t see your vision the same way you do.

 

 

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